LIT 4334: The Golden Age of Children's Literature

Introduction

on January 13, 2013 12:05pm

Hi, my name is Bethany Gugliemino. I am a third year Art History major with a minor in English. I am from Niceville, Florida, but my dad used to be in the Air Force so growing up I lived in several different places, including Japan, Texas, and Illinois. I graduate in December, and I then plan to pursue a Master’s in Art History and eventually work in an art museum. My dream job would be to work in the Victoria & Albert Museum or the Tate Britain in London.

I am taking this class to finish my minor, but I also chose it because I have never taken a class in children’s literature and it seemed like a topic I would enjoy. I am particularly interested in the “Golden Age” aspect of this class and in examining why and how certain books are designated as “classics.” When I think of children’s literature I generally come up with two different categories, picture books and child-oriented chapter books. I tend to associate the term more with chapter books for children because I remember reading chapter books much more than I remember reading picture books.

There are two books on the reading list that I am especially excited about. The first is The Secret Garden because it has always been one of my favorite books and it is responsible for my fascination with sprawling, mysterious houses and rambling, overgrown gardens. The second is The Princess and the Goblin. This was one of the first chapter books I read as a child, but I had forgotten about it entirely until I stumbled upon a copy at the FOL book sale last year and I am looking forward to finally re-reading it. I also find it entertaining that when I first read it, I thought of it not as a children’s book but as my first “grown-up book.”

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